Big Breakfast Bilao

Big Breakfast Bilao

Hello Everyone! Only 2 more days to Christmas and just one more sleep until Noche Buena! I know it’s only a Sunday but I would just like to share a Christmas Special with everyone for a Christmas morning breakfast idea for the table.

I first came across a small single serving of a ‘Breakfast Bilao’ while scrolling through the world of Instagram and then an idea clicked into mind. What if I went BIG with the idea of a Breakfast Bilao? From there I also added a small twist to it, based on creative presentation that I drew inspiration from a couple that I have been following on Instagram for about 3 years now known as @symmetrybreakfast. If you haven’t heard of them before, please do take the time to check out their beautiful feed and give them a follow! (Not sponsored) *cheeky grin* Anyway, I know my Breakfast Bilao may seem very far away from being precisely symmetrical, but that’s where I drew my inspiration from.

Big Breakfast Bilao

So what is a bilao? Well traditionally it is used in the Philippines for winnowing rice, tossing and turning the grains for the purpose of removing unwanted particles such as dirt and small stones. These days, you’re more likely to see a bilao used as a food container lined with banana leaves where food is arranged.

Of course, feel free to get even more creative with your own version of a Breakfast Bilao – the combinations are endless! I put my Breakfast Bilao together after our weekly market day with freshly bought ingredients, but you can most definitely also whip this up with leftover ingredients lying around in your fridge or pantry.

Big Breakfast Bilao Ingredients

PREP TIME 20-30 MINS | COOKING TIME 30-45 MINS | SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

For the corned beef

  • 250g fresh corned beef
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 small potato, diced
  • 1 small red onion, halved and sliced
  • Ground salt and pepper, to taste

For the eggplant omelette

  • 2 medium-sized Lebanese eggplants
  • 2 large free range eggs
  • Ground salt and pepper, to taste

For the garlic fried rice

  • 3 cups of day old cooked rice
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, minced
  • Ground salt and pepper, to taste

For the lato salad

  • 1/2 kg green caviar seaweed (lato)
  • 2 salted eggs, cooked and roughly chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • Fish sauce, to taste
  • Fresh calamansi juice, to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 large free range eggs
  • 2 pcs dried salted fish (tuyo)
  • 2 pcs smoked salted fish (tinapang tuyo)
  • 1 bunch lady fingers (okra), rinsed and trimmed
  • Assorted longganisa (I used Vigan and sliced tocino longganisa)
  • Assorted fruits such as mangoes and oranges

Condiments

  • Dark soy sauce with calamansi
  • Spicy vinegar with fresh chillies, garlic, and peppercorns
  • Sweet chilli sauce
  • Banana leaves

METHOD

Get ready for some more one-pan action!

  1. Preheat oven to 90C (190F) just hot enough to keep each element of the dish warm as we work through each one of them individually.
  2. Prepare the banana leaves by wiping them down with a damp cloth. Quickly pass them over an open flame to make the leaves soft and pliable so that they are easier to work with. Arrange them over the top of your bilao and set aside.
  3. Eggplant Omelette: Grill the eggplants until the colour of skin turns almost black. Let the eggplants cool for a while before peeling off the skin. Set aside.
  4. While waiting for the eggplants to cool down, you can prepare the condiments for your dish.
  5. Crack one egg per grilled eggplant into a deep dish and beat. Add the eggplant to the beaten egg mixture and flatten using a fork.
  6. Heat a large frying pan over medium-high heat with about a tablespoon of oil. Pour the egg mixture together with the eggplant into the pan and fry for about 4 to 5 minutes per side. Once done, place on a heat-proof plate and set aside in the oven.
  7. Fried Egg: Pour and heat a little bit of oil if needed in the same frying pan. Crack the eggs gently into the pan to keep the yolks intact. Don’t overcrowd the pan, so if needed, fry the eggs in batches.
  8. Cook until the tops of the whites are set, but the yolk is still runny. Browned and crispy on the edges with a golden liquidy yolk is how I like my fried eggs! Transfer to a heat-proof plate and set aside in the oven.
  9. Tinapa & Tuyo: In the same pan once again, add a little bit more oil if needed. Heat until the oil is hot, but not smoking. Place the dried fish into the pan and fry until its scales are crisp and start separating from each other, about 2 to 3 minutes per side.
  10. Remove from the heat and transfer to a heat-proof plate lined with a paper towel to soak up any excess oils. Set aside in the oven.
  11. Longganisa: Wipe down the pan with a kitchen towel tissue and place the longganisa in the pan. Add about a quarter cup of water to the pan and bring to a boil. Roll and flip the longganisa occasionally and continue to boil until the water in the pan evaporates.
  12. When the water has fully evaporated, let the longganisa fry in its own oil. Continue to fry the longganisa for about 5 minutes while constantly rolling or flipping them around to cook evenly on all sides.
  13. When the longganisa is slightly crisp on the outside, it’s done! Set aside on a heat-proof plate lined with a paper towel to absorb any excess oil. Place in the oven to keep warm.
  14. Corned Beef: Wipe down the same pan, and add about a tablespoon of oil. Sauté the minced garlic until fragrant and golden brown, about 30 seconds. Add in the onions and cook until soft for about 1 minute before adding in the corned beef.
  15. Continue to cook for 5 to 6 minutes, seasoning with a touch of fragrant and golden brown, about 30 seconds. Add in the diced potatoes and cook further until the potatoes are soft, about 2 to 3 minutes. Once done, place in a small heat-proof bowl and set aside in the oven.
  16. Garlic Fried Rice: Wipe down the pan once again and heat about a tablespoon of oil. Add the minced garlic and sauté until fragrant and golden brown, about 30 seconds.
  17. Add the cooked rice and season with salt and ground pepper to taste. Give it a good mix and continue mixing for about 4-5 minutes to avoid the rice sticking to the bottom of the pan and burning. Turn the heat off and cover to keep warm.
  18. Lato Salad: In a large bowl, combine the tomatoes, salted egg, and lato.
  19. Toss through the fish sauce, calamansi juice, and season with freshly ground black pepper. Adjust to your liking. Set aside for at least 10 minutes before serving.
  20. Okra: In a small saucepan, combine water, okra, and season with a touch of salt. Bring to a boil over high heat. Once boiling, leave the okra to cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until tender. Drain and set aside.
  21. Plate Up: Remove all the cooked elements from the oven and plate up accordingly – feel free to get creative with your plating. As I mentioned above, I drew my inspiration from @symmetrybreakfast eventhough it’s not a clean-cut symmetrical. Serve with coffee or any hot beverage of your choice and there you have it!

Big Breakfast Bilao

Big Breakfast Bilao

Note: You may end up having this Breakfast Bilao for brunch (depending on what time you get up in the morning) as it may take a while to whip together.

Now, I also know that this is hardly festive or Christmassy for a Christmas special, but I had whipped this up a few weeks back and I really wanted to share this with everyone. I didn’t want it to go into my archive file of recipes that may (will) never get posted because it does not suit with theme. Since we’re still all about Breakfast until the end of the year, why not? Maybe you can whip this up for a delightful Christmas morning while the kids are busy opening their gifts. If you don’t have kids, then make it for yourself!

I’ll see everyone again on Christmas Day with the last recipe for the year so stay tuned for that. Hint: Christmas/Simbang Gabi would not be complete without the recipe I’ll be sharing on Wednesday!

For now, I would like to wish my family, friends, visitors, and loyal followers of Amcarmen’s Kitchen a very Merry Christmas!

Big Breakfast Bilao

Big Breakfast Bilao

Big Breakfast Bilao

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

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Oxtail Kare-Kare

Oxtail Kare-Kare

Hello Everyone! So I was just browsing through all the posts I’ve uploaded since I got into a regular uploading schedule and I realised that I actually haven’t posted a savoury dish in a while. I’ve been posting about cakes, cookies, and muffins these past few months! The last savoury dish that I blogged about was back in October with The Ultimate Brekkie (for those who have not seen it, click on it and prepare to drool, seriously).

Today’s recipe is a little different, or may be different to some of my readers/viewers. It is one of my most favourite dishes of all time, and only because my mom used to make it on a regular-enough basis to always have this orgasmic sensation with every bite. It may not suit the taste buds for many I feel, but seriously, every person I’ve made this for, well okay 3 people, loved it so much that they’ve even gone and tried to make it for themselves!

There are a few things to cover in this recipe that many may not know about, so I’ll start of with what even is Kare-Kare. Pronounced kah-reh kah-reh, it is a traditional Philippine stew flavoured with ground roasted peanuts or peanut butter, onions, and garlic; creamy, rich, and thick. Traditionally, a palayok (clay cooking pot) is used to cook this dish and it is also used as the serving pot. Typical meats that make the base for this stew include oxtail (sometimes this is the only meat used), pork hocks, calves feet, pig feet, beef stew meat; and occasionally offal, or tripe, rarely goat or chicken. Besides the meat, vegetables are also cooked with the stew and these include a range of (but are not limited to): eggplant, Chinese cabbage (or other leafy greens), long beans, okra (lady fingers), daikon, etc. – usually equaling or exceeding the amount of meat in the dish. The overall dish is then coloured (and flavoured) with annatto seeds, which is extracted by add the seeds in oil or water. Since I didn’t have some in handy, I just left them out – I feel like it didn’t have a significant effect to the overall flavour of the dish.

This dish is often served and eaten with shrimp paste known in a Philippines as bagoong (pronounced ba-go-ong). Sometimes it is spiced with chilli, or sautéed with garlic, onions, tomatoes, and sprinkled with calamansi (small round lime) juice. Bagoong paste varies in appearance, flavour, and spiciness depending on the type. Pink and salty bagoong is marketed as “fresh”, and is essentially the shrimp-salt mixture left to marinate for a few days. I sautéed a whole jar of shrimp paste and only used about a generous tablespoon of it on the side for this dish. The rest I put back into the jar and into the freezer until for later use. There are many other dishes that you can make with the sautéed shrimp paste and it may pop up in my blog a few more times!

I cooked up this dish for our supposed International (Asian) Feast Night that we had been planning for a while. I say “supposed” because instead of having food from 5 different Asian Cuisines, we ended up only having 3 and it turned out to also be Lydia’s farewell dinner. Basically Lydia cooked a dish from China, Vidhya from India, and me from the Philippines. Jialing (who did not show up by the way because she had a staff dinner) was supposed to make a dish from Malaysia, and Marissa, who already went on holiday, was supposed to make a Vietnamese dish. I was seriously so tired that night, I mean first of all, I had just come back from my Outback trip and only felt the tiredness after returning back. Secondly, I worked from 9am-5pm that day, and when I got home, I straightaway went into the kitchen to cook. I was SO tired that I actually seriously fell asleep at the table after dinner, during dessert. Talk about an induced food coma!

So for this night, which by the way happened about 3 days after I got back from the Red Centre, I decided to make my famous Oxtail Kare-kare. I also made a chicken version for Vidhya because the only meat she eats is chicken (and fish). I’ve never actually tried the dish with chicken before; it turned out okay but in my honest opinion, it wasn’t as flavourful as the Oxtail. I have made this dish in the past as well where I used pork hock/leg, pork shoulder, beef shank or gravy beef, and my mom made it a few times with beef tripe – all these cuts of meat work perfectly well with the dish. Some butchers sell oxtail either whole or cut. If your local butcher happens to seek them whole, just kindly ask them to cut it into rounds for you, that’s what I did. I remember as a little kid that I would always love the bigger cuts because they had more meat in them… Until someone ruined it for me saying that “the bigger the cut, the closer it is to its bum!”

Oxtail Kare-Kare Ingredients

PREP TIME 10 MINS | COOKING TIME 1 HOUR 45 MINS | SERVES 4-6

INGREDIENTS

For the stew

  • 1kg oxtail, cut into rounds
  • 2 cups beef stock
  • 5 dried bay leaves
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed then minced
  • 1 large onion, halved and then sliced
  • 1 tbsp crunchy peanut butter (a very generous tablespoon)
  • 1 tsp rock salt
  • 1 tsp whole black peppercorns
  • Ground salt and pepper
  • Buk Choy, separated
  • Eggplant, sliced diagonally
  • Long beans, cut into 1-inch long strings
  • Okra (lady fingers), whole and then sliced later once cooked

For the sautéed shrimp paste

  • 345g bagoong alamang (shrimp paste)
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed then minced
  • 2 large tomatoes, diced
  • 1 large onion, halved and then sliced
  • 1 tbsp sugar

METHOD

  1.  Add the oxtail, bay leaves, rock salt and whole peppercorns to a large pot with about a litre of water, or enough to submerge the meat. Boil for about 1 to 1 and a half hours until tender. If you are using a pressure cooker (which I don’t have), 30-35 minutes should do the trick! Once the meat is tender, remove from the heat and set aside. Do not throw away the stock.
  2. While your meat is tenderising, move onto sautéing the shrimp paste. Heat oil in a medium-sized frying pan and sauté garlic and onions until fragrant. Add the tomatoes in and sauté until they have softened. Add the shrimp paste in and give it a good mix. Add in the sugar and let it simmer for about 5 minutes. Turn the heat off and set aside. You may need to heat it up again before serving.
  3. Heat oil over medium-high heat in another pot and sauté the garlic and onions until fragrant. Add the the oxtails, season with ground salt and pepper, and give it a good stir. Add the peanut butter to two cups of the stock and stir until the peanut butter has softened. Add the peanut butter mix to the oxtail and bring the heat to low. Let it simmer for about 8-10 minutes. If you want your stew to be less creamy and thick, add more stock to your liking.
  4. Meanwhile, bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil and cook your vegetables for no longer than 5 minutes. Drain and transfer the cooked vegetables to your oxtail stew just before serving. Serve hot with sautéed shrimp paste and enjoy!

Oxtail Kare-Kare

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com