Puto Bumbong

Puto Bumbong

Hello Everyone! I’d like to start the last post for the year by wishing everyone a very Merry Christmas! I hope everyone had a splendid eve celebrating, feasting, and continuing tradition with family and loved ones. What are some of your Christmas traditions? I’d love to know in the comments below! We had a simple and quiet Noche Buena at home, and of course watched some Christmas classics such as the Home Alone series. We’re not a family who gives gifts during the season of Christmas because we treat each other throughout the year – be in paying for the entire meal when we eat out as a family, or paying for the tickets and snacks when we go to the cinema together; gifts that allow us to spend time together as a family rather than materialistic things.

That aside, I mentioned in my last post that Christmas or Simbang Gabi would not be complete without this famous breakfast kakanin that is sold alongside Bibingka just outside the church. But, as all the other kakanins out there, you don’t have to wait until the Christmas season to roll around as you can find Puto Bumbong every day of the year at your local market, various street stalls, and in many restaurants and cafés nationwide.

Team Bibingka or Team Puto Bumbong

Puto Bumbong is a type of Filipino steamed rice cake that is traditionally made from a special variety of heirloom sticky (glutinous) rice known as pirurutong which has a distinct purple colour to it. Food colouring is not necessary for this. It is soaked in salted water and then dried overnight. It is then ground in a grinder made of solid stone before it is stuffed into a bamboo tube known as bumbong ng kawayan. It is then steamed until steam rises out of the bamboo tubes, placed onto a pre-cut banana leaf, and topped with margarine (or butter), grated coconut, and muscovado sugar to enhance its flavours.

And so for my last breakfast recipe of the year, I will share two ways in how you can make Puto Bumbong at home, with and without the bamboo tubes – depending if you have bamboo tubes readily available or not to be able to tackle this recipe. Before we dive in, be sure to check out the original recipe that I followed over on Panlasang Pinoy.

Puto Bumbong

PREP TIME 2 DAYS* | COOKING TIME 20 MINS | SERVES 6

*Be sure to allot yourself 2 days before you plan on tackling this recipe, as the rice needs to soak.

INGREDIENTS

For the puto bumbong

  • 6 cups water at room temperature, for soaking the rice
  • 1 & 1/3 cup sticky purple rice
  • 1 & 1/3 cup white glutinous rice
  • 2/3 cup long grain purple rice

For the toppings

  • Freshly grated coconut
  • Muscovado sugar
  • Softened butter or margarine
  • Banana leaves
  • Bamboo tubes

METHOD

  1. Combine all the different types of rice in a large mixing bowl together with the room temperature water. Set aside and leave to soak for at least 2 days.
  2. Drain and place the soaked rice in a large food processor. Pulse and grind until the rice becomes very fine (takes about 8 to 10 minutes to achieve this consistency). If you only have a small food processor handy, then work the rice in batches.

Cooking with Bamboo Tubes

  1. Fill each bumbong (bamboo tube) with the powdered rice mixture, making sure not to compress the rice to allow the steam to pass easily.
  2. Prepare the steamer with enough water for steaming. Once the water has been brought to a boil, arrange each bamboo tube on the steamer. Cook until steam starts coming out of the tubes, about 8 to 10 minutes.
  3. Remove the tubes from the steamer, and carefully remove the puto bumbong from the tube and place over a piece of banana leaf.
  4. Spread with butter or margarine (I chose to leave this out of my serving) and top with freshly grated coconut and muscovado sugar. Serve, share, and enjoy with a hot cuppa!

Cooking without Bamboo Tubes

  1. Add about 2 cups of water to the powered rice mixture and mix together to form a dough. You may need less or more water, depending, so it’s best to add the water in gradually. Knead until smooth.
  2. Pinch off about 2 tablespoons of the dough and, using your hands, make a ball and then roll into a log, about 4 to 5 inches in length. Alternatively you can place the dough into a piping bag and using piping tip #807, pipe the dough onto a heat-proof plate greased with a bit of butter or margarine.
  3. Place the plate into a prepared steamer with a muslin-covered lid to prevent any droplets of water dripping onto the puto bumbong mixture. Steam for about 8 – 10 minutes.
  4. Remove from the steamer and place onto a banana leaf. Top with your preferred toppings and enjoy!

Puto Bumbong

A lot has happened this year, both in my personal and work life, which resulted in me having to put my attention to Amcarmen’s Kitchen on hold for a couple of months collectively. That being said, I’m going to try my best not to take as many breaks as possible for the upcoming year ahead, *fingers crossed*

I usually take the first month of the beginning of the year off to properly plan for the upcoming year ahead and to get a head start on experimenting in the kitchen for recipes to share with you guys. But since I haven’t been working since August of this year (still continuing to look for a job as I write this), I’ve had time to plan ahead and I’m excited to share with you what I have in store for the upcoming year! You’ll just have to wait until next week to find out the theme for the year ahead – which technically is in another week I just realised!

So for now, I would like to wish all my family, friends, and followers a Happy & Prosperous New Year! May the New Year bring you happiness, health, wealth, and peace!

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

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Big Breakfast Bilao

Big Breakfast Bilao

Hello Everyone! Only 2 more days to Christmas and just one more sleep until Noche Buena! I know it’s only a Sunday but I would just like to share a Christmas Special with everyone for a Christmas morning breakfast idea for the table.

I first came across a small single serving of a ‘Breakfast Bilao’ while scrolling through the world of Instagram and then an idea clicked into mind. What if I went BIG with the idea of a Breakfast Bilao? From there I also added a small twist to it, based on creative presentation that I drew inspiration from a couple that I have been following on Instagram for about 3 years now known as @symmetrybreakfast. If you haven’t heard of them before, please do take the time to check out their beautiful feed and give them a follow! (Not sponsored) *cheeky grin* Anyway, I know my Breakfast Bilao may seem very far away from being precisely symmetrical, but that’s where I drew my inspiration from.

Big Breakfast Bilao

So what is a bilao? Well traditionally it is used in the Philippines for winnowing rice, tossing and turning the grains for the purpose of removing unwanted particles such as dirt and small stones. These days, you’re more likely to see a bilao used as a food container lined with banana leaves where food is arranged.

Of course, feel free to get even more creative with your own version of a Breakfast Bilao – the combinations are endless! I put my Breakfast Bilao together after our weekly market day with freshly bought ingredients, but you can most definitely also whip this up with leftover ingredients lying around in your fridge or pantry.

Big Breakfast Bilao Ingredients

PREP TIME 20-30 MINS | COOKING TIME 30-45 MINS | SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

For the corned beef

  • 250g fresh corned beef
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 small potato, diced
  • 1 small red onion, halved and sliced
  • Ground salt and pepper, to taste

For the eggplant omelette

  • 2 medium-sized Lebanese eggplants
  • 2 large free range eggs
  • Ground salt and pepper, to taste

For the garlic fried rice

  • 3 cups of day old cooked rice
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, minced
  • Ground salt and pepper, to taste

For the lato salad

  • 1/2 kg green caviar seaweed (lato)
  • 2 salted eggs, cooked and roughly chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • Fish sauce, to taste
  • Fresh calamansi juice, to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 large free range eggs
  • 2 pcs dried salted fish (tuyo)
  • 2 pcs smoked salted fish (tinapang tuyo)
  • 1 bunch lady fingers (okra), rinsed and trimmed
  • Assorted longganisa (I used Vigan and sliced tocino longganisa)
  • Assorted fruits such as mangoes and oranges

Condiments

  • Dark soy sauce with calamansi
  • Spicy vinegar with fresh chillies, garlic, and peppercorns
  • Sweet chilli sauce
  • Banana leaves

METHOD

Get ready for some more one-pan action!

  1. Preheat oven to 90C (190F) just hot enough to keep each element of the dish warm as we work through each one of them individually.
  2. Prepare the banana leaves by wiping them down with a damp cloth. Quickly pass them over an open flame to make the leaves soft and pliable so that they are easier to work with. Arrange them over the top of your bilao and set aside.
  3. Eggplant Omelette: Grill the eggplants until the colour of skin turns almost black. Let the eggplants cool for a while before peeling off the skin. Set aside.
  4. While waiting for the eggplants to cool down, you can prepare the condiments for your dish.
  5. Crack one egg per grilled eggplant into a deep dish and beat. Add the eggplant to the beaten egg mixture and flatten using a fork.
  6. Heat a large frying pan over medium-high heat with about a tablespoon of oil. Pour the egg mixture together with the eggplant into the pan and fry for about 4 to 5 minutes per side. Once done, place on a heat-proof plate and set aside in the oven.
  7. Fried Egg: Pour and heat a little bit of oil if needed in the same frying pan. Crack the eggs gently into the pan to keep the yolks intact. Don’t overcrowd the pan, so if needed, fry the eggs in batches.
  8. Cook until the tops of the whites are set, but the yolk is still runny. Browned and crispy on the edges with a golden liquidy yolk is how I like my fried eggs! Transfer to a heat-proof plate and set aside in the oven.
  9. Tinapa & Tuyo: In the same pan once again, add a little bit more oil if needed. Heat until the oil is hot, but not smoking. Place the dried fish into the pan and fry until its scales are crisp and start separating from each other, about 2 to 3 minutes per side.
  10. Remove from the heat and transfer to a heat-proof plate lined with a paper towel to soak up any excess oils. Set aside in the oven.
  11. Longganisa: Wipe down the pan with a kitchen towel tissue and place the longganisa in the pan. Add about a quarter cup of water to the pan and bring to a boil. Roll and flip the longganisa occasionally and continue to boil until the water in the pan evaporates.
  12. When the water has fully evaporated, let the longganisa fry in its own oil. Continue to fry the longganisa for about 5 minutes while constantly rolling or flipping them around to cook evenly on all sides.
  13. When the longganisa is slightly crisp on the outside, it’s done! Set aside on a heat-proof plate lined with a paper towel to absorb any excess oil. Place in the oven to keep warm.
  14. Corned Beef: Wipe down the same pan, and add about a tablespoon of oil. Sauté the minced garlic until fragrant and golden brown, about 30 seconds. Add in the onions and cook until soft for about 1 minute before adding in the corned beef.
  15. Continue to cook for 5 to 6 minutes, seasoning with a touch of fragrant and golden brown, about 30 seconds. Add in the diced potatoes and cook further until the potatoes are soft, about 2 to 3 minutes. Once done, place in a small heat-proof bowl and set aside in the oven.
  16. Garlic Fried Rice: Wipe down the pan once again and heat about a tablespoon of oil. Add the minced garlic and sauté until fragrant and golden brown, about 30 seconds.
  17. Add the cooked rice and season with salt and ground pepper to taste. Give it a good mix and continue mixing for about 4-5 minutes to avoid the rice sticking to the bottom of the pan and burning. Turn the heat off and cover to keep warm.
  18. Lato Salad: In a large bowl, combine the tomatoes, salted egg, and lato.
  19. Toss through the fish sauce, calamansi juice, and season with freshly ground black pepper. Adjust to your liking. Set aside for at least 10 minutes before serving.
  20. Okra: In a small saucepan, combine water, okra, and season with a touch of salt. Bring to a boil over high heat. Once boiling, leave the okra to cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until tender. Drain and set aside.
  21. Plate Up: Remove all the cooked elements from the oven and plate up accordingly – feel free to get creative with your plating. As I mentioned above, I drew my inspiration from @symmetrybreakfast eventhough it’s not a clean-cut symmetrical. Serve with coffee or any hot beverage of your choice and there you have it!

Big Breakfast Bilao

Big Breakfast Bilao

Note: You may end up having this Breakfast Bilao for brunch (depending on what time you get up in the morning) as it may take a while to whip together.

Now, I also know that this is hardly festive or Christmassy for a Christmas special, but I had whipped this up a few weeks back and I really wanted to share this with everyone. I didn’t want it to go into my archive file of recipes that may (will) never get posted because it does not suit with theme. Since we’re still all about Breakfast until the end of the year, why not? Maybe you can whip this up for a delightful Christmas morning while the kids are busy opening their gifts. If you don’t have kids, then make it for yourself!

I’ll see everyone again on Christmas Day with the last recipe for the year so stay tuned for that. Hint: Christmas/Simbang Gabi would not be complete without the recipe I’ll be sharing on Wednesday!

For now, I would like to wish my family, friends, visitors, and loyal followers of Amcarmen’s Kitchen a very Merry Christmas!

Big Breakfast Bilao

Big Breakfast Bilao

Big Breakfast Bilao

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

Classic Champorado (Chocolate Rice Porridge)

Classic Champorado (Chocolate Rice Porridge)

Hello Everyone! I hope everyone has had a fantabulous week so far and will have a great week ahead with the weekend to look forward to. Tonight I will be sharing a Filipino breakfast staple that is sure to spark some doubts, especially amongst those who aren’t very familiar with this foreign food pairing. Let me explain further.

Champorado, or in English, Chocolate Rice Pudding, is a classic dish found in many homes across the Philippines commonly served for breakfast. Chocolate for breakfast sounds like a heavenly dream doesn’t it? But wait, there’s a catch! Champorado is usually served with a piece of Tuyo, which in English is known as dried salted fish! Chocolate and dried salted fish?! That sounds like a bizarre combination!

Classic Champorado (Chocolate Rice Porridge)

Is it really though? While the sound of pairing chocolate together with fish seems like whoever came up with this combination was stoned, drunk, or suffered a milk mild concussion, let’s look at the flavour profiles instead. Okay before I continue, I would like to take a small shortcut – I had a major laugh fit when proof reading what I wrote above… What even is a milk concussion?!

Anyway, continuing on, there are a lot of impeccable desserts and sweet dishes out there that embrace the salty-sweet combination, and that’s exactly what you get from Champorado and Tuyo. It’s exactly like eating salted chocolate! The dried salted fish, which is shredded and mixed into the Champorado adds pops of salty surprises to each spoonful of the sweet chocolate rice porridge that you take.

Still not convinced? As the say, don’t judge a book by it’s cover if you haven’t tried it yet. Otherwise, you could get away with adding a pinch of rock salt into your Champorado – but it won’t be the same.

Classic Champorado (Chocolate Rice Porridge) Ingredients

PREP TIME 5 MINS | COOKING TIME 25 MINS | SERVES 8

INGREDIENTS

  • 5 pieces tsokolate tablea*
  • 1 cup glutinous rice
  • 6 cups water
  • 3 tbsp brown sugar

Topping choices

  • Cacao nibs
  • Fried tuyo
  • Full cream milk
  • Sweetened condensed milk
  • Other dairy alternatives such as almond milk and/or coconut milk

*Tsokolate tablea, or literally translated to chocolate tablets is dried local cocoa beans roasted for a few hours before being ground to a rich, chocolate-y paste. Sugar, most often muscovado, is then added to the paste before it is shaped into balls or tablets, hence its name. Tsokolate tablea is traditionally used to make Champorado, but other alternatives such as unsweetened cocoa powder or a dark chocolate bar can be used in its place.

METHOD

  1. Pour the water into a large heavy bottom saucepot over medium-high heat and bring to a brisking boil. Add in the tablea chocolate and dissolve. Once dissolved, add in the rice and bring back to a boil.
  2. Once boiling, turn the heat down to reduce to a simmer and stir the rice every 3 minutes or so to prevent it from sticking to the bottom of the pot and burning. Leave uncovered to cook further for another 15 to 20 minutes until the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked through. The consistency should be thick but soft, just like porridge.
  3. Add in the brown sugar and stir to combine until dissolved. Remove from the heat and transfer into individual serving bowls. Top with dairy of choice and fried tuyo (optional for those feeling adventurous).
  4. Serve and enjoy!

Classic Champorado (Chocolate Rice Porridge)

Note: Even after cooking with the heat turned off, the glutinous rice will continue to expand and absorb the liquid, therefore it is important to serve it immediately to avoid dry Champorado.

You may also like to add a bit of chilli to your Champorado. It is not traditionally a spicy dish, but if you want that extra kick to the guts to get you going in the mornings, then go for it! Chocolate and chilli afterall is another classic flavour combination!

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

Lucban Longsilog

Lucban Longsilog

Hello Everyone! I’ll start of with a question for all of you this morning:

What did you have for breakfast this morning?

When I was still working in Brunei for the past few years, I would kicking off my day with breakfast by 6:30am which is usually either a bowl of oatmeal with fruits, bread with whatever spread was available (most likely peanut butter), pancakes, or instant noodles. Whichever it was for that day, none of these would last me until my noon lunch break. At most, I could only last until about 10:00am (and that’s already pushing it). The rest of the two hours, I usually sit at my desk dreaming of lunch and unfortunately continue to have an unproductive latter part of the morning.

Filipinos and most Asians in general love to eat rice in almost every meal, including breakfast. Rice provides more energy and keeps us full and focused longer – but as a kid, my siblings and I were never brought up on having rice for breakfast. Even having been back in the Philippines for just over two months now, not once did we have rice for breakfast. The –silogs you’ll be seeing for this month on Amcarmen’s Kitchen is actually breakfast for dinner *cheeky grin*

Here’s another question for you, especially to all my kabayans out there:

What’s your favourite type of longganisa?

Lucban Longsilog

The great thing about longganisa is that they come in many variations depending on the province they originate from, but nonetheless are all mouth-watering breakfast delights. Provinces such as Vigan, Lucban, Tuguegarao, Cabanatuan, Alaminos, Cebu, Camlumpit, Bacolod, Pampanga, Guinobatan, and many more boast of their own unique blend of ingredients that is specific to their region that goes into the making of their longganisa. For example, what makes Vigan Longganisa so popular is its garlicky and sour notes that come from the combination of Ilocos sugar cane vinegar (sukang Iloko) and local garlic from Sinait which are both major products of the Vigan province.

I have yet to try all the types of longganisa around the Philippines, but to date, my long-time favourite is most definitely the Lucban Longganisa! They are very popular for their aromatic and garlicky smell! If you happen to visit the province of Lucban, Quezon, you will definitely not miss this longganisa because it is displayed in the markets, and even along the roads in the many parts of the town. The best part? I don’t have to travel all the way to Lucban, or wait for a relative to bring some back as pasalubong – I can now find freshly made ones at our local weekend produce market, and I even spotted some at our local grocers too! Additionally, they’re not that hard to make at home yourself!

Longganisa is definitely a very popular Filipino breakfast staple that is best paired with sinangag (garlicky fried rice), fried egg, and a spicy (optional) vinegar dipping sauce for added taste on the side.

Homemade Lucban Longganisa

(Original recipe from Panlasang Pinoy)

PREP TIME 1 HOUR* | COOKING TIME | MAKES 2 DOZEN SAUSAGES

*Plus 8 to 12 hours of refrigeration time before cooking

INGREDIENTS

  • 1kg ground lean pork belly or shoulder**
  • 1/2 cup cane vinegar
  • 4 tbsp pork fat, cut into small cubes
  • 3 tbsp garlic, minced
  • 7 tsp smoked Spanish paprika
  • 4 tsp rock salt
  • 2 tsp white granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • Dried hog casing or sausage casing (about 1-inch in diameter)

**Or you can just buy lean ground pork if you don’t like to grind the meat yourself.

METHOD

  1. Add the ground pork, pork fat, salt, smoked paprika, garlic, oregano, sugar, and vinegar in a large mixing bowl. Mix the ingredients together thoroughly until well combine. Set it aside for about 30 minutes for the flavours to fully develop and infuse into the meat.
  2. Soak the dried hog casing in warm water for about 3 minutes. Tie the first end of the casing and stuff using a funnel or a sausage stuffer with the meat mixture. Make links of longganisa about 2 to 3 inches apart or depending on how long you want your longganisa to be.
  3. Refrigerate for at least 8 to 12 hours before cooking or you can store it in the freezer.

Lucban Longsilog

Lucban Longsilog

PREP TIME 20 MINS | COOKING TIME 30 MINS | SERVES 3

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 dozen homemade or store-bought lonnganisa

To serve with

  • Garlicky fried rice
  • Fried sunny-side up egg
  • Spicy vinegar

METHOD

  1. Heat a medium-sized frying pan over medium-high. Add about a quarter cup of water to the pan together with the longganisa. Bring the water to a boil. Roll the longganisa occasionally and continue to boil until the water in the pan evaporates.
  2. When the water has fully evaporated, let the longganisa fry in its own oil. Continue to fry the longganisa for about 5 minutes while constantly rolling them around to cook evenly on all sides. When the longganisa is slightly crisp on the outside, it’s done!
  3. Serve hot with garlicky fried rice and fried egg – browned and crispy on the edges with a golden liquidy yolk is how I like my fried eggs.

Lucban Longsilog

Before I end today’s post, yes I am fully aware that it’s not a Wednesday night yet, but this recipe was supposed to go up last Wednesday. At the time I was actually back in Brunei for a couple of days to tie up some loose ends. I got home late that night (well okay, at 9pm) but was super exhausted from the events of that day that I just passed out when I hit the sheets. So anyway, I’m getting this up now so that I can get tomorrow’s scheduled post up on time (hopefully).

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com