Tohu Thoke (Chickpea Tofu Salad)

Tohu Thoke (Chickpea Tofu Salad)

Hello Everyone! This will be the last Burmese recipe that I will be sharing on our Flavours of Southeast Asia journey throughMyanmar for the month of September. Next week we’ll be heading off to one of the remaining three Southeast Asian countries I have yet to cover for the year.

The recipe that I will be sharing tonight is a build on of the recipe for Tohu (Burmese Chickpea Tofu) that I shared last week. We’ll be turning the tohu into a delicious salad known as Tohu Thoke, or in English, Chickpea Tofu Salad. Ever since coming across this recipe, I’ve already made this salad three times this month – yes it’s THAT addicting! Not only does it taste oh-so good, it’s also very easy to put together which makes it ideal for a quick weeknight dinner, provided that you’ve made the chickpea tofu in batches and ahead of time. This salad is also perfect for vegetarians, vegans, and Meatless Mondays.

Tohu Thoke (Chickpea Tofu Salad)

Tohu Thoke is bright, tangy, refreshing, and meant to be eaten cold, therefore perfect for those hot summer days. By mixing both fresh and fried tohu together, you get creamy, silky-smooth, and crispy textures altogether. If you don’t fancy frying, then feel free to skip it. It’s nevertheless delicious with or without the fried aspect or not. Also, the triangle shape for the fried tofu pieces isn’t necessary; cut them into whatever shape you want; same goes for the fresh ones too.

The great thing about this salad is that it gives you the chance to get creative with it. As long as you keep the sour flavours of the tamarind dressing and balance with a hint of sweetness and heat (which is essential to Burmese cuisine), you can bulk up the salad with other vegetables or leafy greens to make it more substantial and a full meal on its own.

Tohu Thoke (Chickpea Tofu Salad) Ingredients

PREP TIME 15 MINS | COOKING TIME 10 MINS | SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

For the tamarind dressing

  • 5 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 1 stalk scallion (white part), thinly sliced
  • 2 tbsp tamarind paste
  • 1 tbsp water
  • 4 tsp coconut sugar
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper powder

For the tohu thoke

  • 1 recipe for Tohu (Burmese Chickpea Tofu), fresh and fried pieces
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 3 kaffir lime leaves, thinly sliced
  • 1 red chilli, finely minced
  • Handful of bean sprouts, blanched
  • 3 tbsp sesame oil

To garnish

  • Crispy shallots or garlic
  • Roasted peanuts, crushed
  • Scallions (green part), thinly sliced

METHOD

  1. Dressing: Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl. Mix and adjust the dressing to your taste. Set aside. Extra dressing can keep for up to 1 month in the refrigerator.
  2. Tohu Thoke: Add all the ingredients into a large mixing bowl. Add the tamarind dressing, about a quarter cup for this recipe, and gently toss everything together.
  3. Transfer to a serving plate and top with the garnishes. Serve immediately and enjoy!

Tohu Thoke (Chickpea Tofu Salad)

Tohu Thoke (Chickpea Tofu Salad)

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

Tohu (Burmese Chickpea Tofu)

Tohu (Burmese Chickpea Tofu)

Hello Everyone! This is probably one of the best food discoveries that I have come across from the many years of researching for Amcarmen’s Kitchen and experimenting in the kitchen.

Tohu, or in English, Burmese Tofu, is made using chickpea (besan) flour, mixed with water, a little salt, and if you want, turmeric powder, mainly to give it a more vibrant yellow colour. The mixture is then heated and stirred constantly, until it reaches a thick and creamy consistency. It is then transferred into a tray and allowed to set.

The end result is matte yellow in colour, jelly-like but firm in consistency, therefore it does not crumble when cut or sliced. It is basically the best of both worlds between silken tofu and egg tofu – you get the silkiness of the silken tofu and firmness from the egg tofu in this Burmese tofu. The best part? It is dairy, egg, and soy-free; perfect for vegetarians, vegan, and/or anyone with soy allergies!

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Additionally, chickpea flour is high in protein, fiber, and micronutrients, while being low in carbohydrates and calories. Half a cup of chickpea flour contains an impressive 11 grams of protein, 5 grams of fiber, and nutrients like folate, iron, magnesium, and zinc. Chickpea flour is also heart-healthy, making this Burmese tofu oh-so healthy!

In Myanmar, the tofu can be eaten fresh in a salad, deep fried to make tofu fritters, or sliced very thinly and dried to make crackers for deep frying. It is also used in curries as well for added protein if meat or poultry is unaffordable (especially amongst the poorer population).

I still have some besan flour on hand after making this recipe, so I can definitely say that I will be making more of these delicious Burmese tofu and experimenting them in certain dishes outside of Burmese cuisine!

Tohu (Burmese Chickpea Tofu)

PREP TIME 1 HOUR | COOKING TIME 8 MINS | SERVES 2-3

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup chickpea flour (also known as garbanzo bean flour or besan flour)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp ground turmeric (optional)
  • 3 cups water, divided
  • Oil

METHOD

  1. Lightly grease an 8-in x 8-in baking dish with a bit of neutral flavoured oil.
  2. Add the chickpea flour in a medium-sized mixing bowl together with the salt and, if using, the ground turmeric as well. Whisk to combine.
  3. Add 1 and a half cups of water to the flour and whisk until smooth.
  4. Add the remaining 1 and a half cups of water into a small saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat.
  5. Once boiling, reduce the heat to medium-high and slowly pour the chickpea flour mixture into the boiling water while continuing to whisk.
  6. Whisk over the heat until the mixture becomes really thick and glossy. This should take about 8 minutes in total.
  7. Once done, immediately pour the mixture into your prepared baking dish and leave it to cool down at room temperature for at least an hour. The longer you let it sit, the more water will drain out of the tofu and therefore firmer in texture.
  8. Cut into your desired shapes and sizes, depending on how you will use it. Enjoy it as it is, deep fried, or use it as a source of protein for other dishes.

Tohu (Burmese Chickpea Tofu)

Stay tuned next week to see what Burmese dish I will make with this Burmese Tofu!

Note: You can store the tofu in an airtight container and in the fridge for up to 3 days.

Tohu (Burmese Chickpea Tofu)

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

Hello Everyone! It’s time to pack up our bags and head onto our next destination on our Flavours of Southeast Asia – to Myanmar! Myanmar (Burmese) cuisine is known for the simplicity of its recipes. Essentially, the building blocks to most dishes use shallots, turmeric, and peanut oil. Other ingredients to give a dish more complexity include ginger, garlic, tomatoes, lime, chillies, dried shrimp, and fish sauce.

Out of all the Southeast Asian cuisines, I would have to say that, alongside Cambodia and East Timor, Myanmar too is a cuisine that I am most unfamiliar with. Nevertheless, I’m up for the challenge to share with you some dishes that I have come across during my research.

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

Htamin Gyaw (don’t ask me how to pronounce it *cheeky grin*), or in English, Fried Rice with Boiled Peas is the traditional Burmese recipe for fried rice. Like with every cuisine, adaptations of this fried rice can be found in different households. A popular plain version consists of rice, boiled peas, onions, garlic, and dark soy sauce. The dish is a common breakfast meal in Myanmar, but it can also be served for lunch and/or dinner. The rice can optionally be topped with a fried egg and served with any leftovers you may have lying around from a meal the night before.

The version that I will be making to share with everyone tonight consists of fried red onions in place of shallots, peas, chillies, and turmeric. I also served it with a side of blanched bok choy, sunny side up egg, and drizzled some sriracha sauce on top. If you want to keep this meal vegetarian or vegan-friendly, then feel free to omit the egg.

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice) Ingredients

PREP TIME 10 MINS | COOKING TIME 20 MINS | SERVES 5-6

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 cups day old cooked rice
  • 2 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 small red onion, diced
  • 1 stalk spring onion (white and light green parts only), finely sliced
  • 1 long green chilli, sliced
  • 1 red bird’s eye chilli, sliced
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 cup green peas, fresh or frozen
  • Fried red onions
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Blanched bok choy
  • Fresh red and green chillies
  • Sunny side up egg
  • Sriracha sauce
  • Lemon or lime wedges

METHOD

  1. Add the sesame oil into a large pan over medium-high heat. Sauté the onions until cooked through, about 3 minutes before adding the sliced spring onion and chillies. Cook for a further 30 seconds and then add in the turmeric powder.
  2. Add the cooked rice and mix well, breaking up any remaining clumps of rice. Season with salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste and cook for a further 5 minutes making sure to coat every single grain of rice in the turmeric evenly.
  3. Add the green peas along with the fried red onions and cook for another 5 minutes. Taste and adjust as you go.
  4. Once done, transfer the rice to individual serving bowls and serve with blanched bok choy, a sunny side up egg, and a lemon or lime wedge on the side. Top with extra chillies and fried red onion if you wish, and a drizzle of sriracha sauce. Enjoy!
  5. In Myanmar, this dish would also often be served with a condiment known as ngapi kyaw, which is fried fish paste with shredded fish flakes. Of course, if you want to keep the dish vegetarian/vegan-friendly, you can leave this out. Fresh cucumber strips mixed with chopped onions, green chillies, and vinegar can also be served with this fried rice.

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com