Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

Hello Everyone! It’s time to pack up our bags and head onto our next destination on our Flavours of Southeast Asia – to Myanmar! Myanmar (Burmese) cuisine is known for the simplicity of its recipes. Essentially, the building blocks to most dishes use shallots, turmeric, and peanut oil. Other ingredients to give a dish more complexity include ginger, garlic, tomatoes, lime, chillies, dried shrimp, and fish sauce.

Out of all the Southeast Asian cuisines, I would have to say that, alongside Cambodia and East Timor, Myanmar too is a cuisine that I am most unfamiliar with. Nevertheless, I’m up for the challenge to share with you some dishes that I have come across during my research.

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

Htamin Gyaw (don’t ask me how to pronounce it *cheeky grin*), or in English, Fried Rice with Boiled Peas is the traditional Burmese recipe for fried rice. Like with every cuisine, adaptations of this fried rice can be found in different households. A popular plain version consists of rice, boiled peas, onions, garlic, and dark soy sauce. The dish is a common breakfast meal in Myanmar, but it can also be served for lunch and/or dinner. The rice can optionally be topped with a fried egg and served with any leftovers you may have lying around from a meal the night before.

The version that I will be making to share with everyone tonight consists of fried red onions in place of shallots, peas, chillies, and turmeric. I also served it with a side of blanched bok choy, sunny side up egg, and drizzled some sriracha sauce on top. If you want to keep this meal vegetarian or vegan-friendly, then feel free to omit the egg.

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice) Ingredients

PREP TIME 10 MINS | COOKING TIME 20 MINS | SERVES 5-6

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 cups day old cooked rice
  • 2 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 small red onion, diced
  • 1 stalk spring onion (white and light green parts only), finely sliced
  • 1 long green chilli, sliced
  • 1 red bird’s eye chilli, sliced
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 cup green peas, fresh or frozen
  • Fried red onions
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • Blanched bok choy
  • Fresh red and green chillies
  • Sunny side up egg
  • Sriracha sauce
  • Lemon or lime wedges

METHOD

  1. Add the sesame oil into a large pan over medium-high heat. Sauté the onions until cooked through, about 3 minutes before adding the sliced spring onion and chillies. Cook for a further 30 seconds and then add in the turmeric powder.
  2. Add the cooked rice and mix well, breaking up any remaining clumps of rice. Season with salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste and cook for a further 5 minutes making sure to coat every single grain of rice in the turmeric evenly.
  3. Add the green peas along with the fried red onions and cook for another 5 minutes. Taste and adjust as you go.
  4. Once done, transfer the rice to individual serving bowls and serve with blanched bok choy, a sunny side up egg, and a lemon or lime wedge on the side. Top with extra chillies and fried red onion if you wish, and a drizzle of sriracha sauce. Enjoy!
  5. In Myanmar, this dish would also often be served with a condiment known as ngapi kyaw, which is fried fish paste with shredded fish flakes. Of course, if you want to keep the dish vegetarian/vegan-friendly, you can leave this out. Fresh cucumber strips mixed with chopped onions, green chillies, and vinegar can also be served with this fried rice.

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

Htamin Gyaw (Burmese-style Fried Rice)

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

Auguest 2021: Jialing Mew

Vietnamese-inspired Tofu Rolls

“Waste not, want not.” — Jialing Mew

Auguest 2021: Jialing Mew

Let me just preface this year’s recipe by saying that my goal was not to recreate an authentic or traditional Vietnamese dish. Despite having grown up in South East Asia, Vietnamese cuisine was not really something I’d experienced much of until I moved to Sydney (slightly ironic, yes, but Australia is truly a melting pot of cuisines and cultures!). And so, not wanting to butcher any of the already perfect Vietnamese favourites I’ve come to love in my twenties, I decided to instead draw inspiration from some Vietnamese-Australian fusion I’d eaten in Melbourne during one of the brief intermissions between lockdowns.

As with every other Auguest, it was definitely a… journey… for me to get to this recipe. The original game plan was to take advantage of popular local seafood, such as barramundi. But fate had other plans. Due to a highly traumatising incident while pet-sitting for tropical fish (who I now see as the vicious, carnivorous killers they truly are!), my stomach forced me to swear off all forms of fish flesh for the foreseeable future.

Vietnamese-inspired Tofu Rolls Ingredients

Also, having been under pretty strict lockdown for almost as long as I can remember, I’ve had fairly limited access to specialty Asian ingredients. Many servings of banh mi and bowls of bun cha later (you know, for research, and supporting local businesses), I came up with another idea – sausage rolls! Such an iconic Australian food, yet every bakery and home cook has their own special recipe. I dreamt up a great chicken sausage roll recipe packed with aromatics and fresh ingredients reminiscent of my experience with Vietnamese-Australian cuisine.

The recipe was right up my alley, and came together with hardly a hiccup. But then last week my brain decided to remind me that Allison’s blog is now actually kind of pescatarian/vegetarian/vegan – which chicken is not.

Vietnamese-inspired Tofu Rolls

And so I resorted to the last-minute brain scramble I thought I’d gotten past, frantically modifying the recipe I’d perfected at the beginning of the month. So much for preparedness, but it kind of worked out in the end, and to be honest I’m not mad at the vegetarian version (#sorrynotsorry to all the vegans, though).

My recipe is still chicken-based, but I’ve also included some modifications to make a pretty tasty tofu filling, so feel free to choose your own adventure with this recipe!

Unless it’s vegan.

Vietnamese-inspired Tofu Rolls Ingredients

PREP TIME 20 MINS | COOKING TIME 1 HOUR | MAKES 15 ROLLS

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 sheets puff pastry
  • 1 egg, beaten

For the filling

  • 500g firm tofu (or 500g chicken mince)
  • 1 cup (65g) fried scallions
  • 1 stalk fresh lemongrass, ends and outer leaves discarded, pale inner bulb finely minced
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp fresh ginger, minced
  • Small bunch of fresh coriander, about 1/4 cup finely chopped
  • 2 red bird’s eye chills, minced
  • 2-3 eggs (1 egg if using chicken)
  • 1 tbsp lime juice
    3 tsp fish sauce (or soy sauce)

For the dipping sauce

  • 1/2 cup ketchup
  • 2 tbsp sriracha

METHOD

  1. Press a 500g block of firm tofu between several layers of paper towels with a flat heavy object on top to remove excess water. Let it sit for about an hour, then use your hands, a large grater, or knife and cutting board to turn the tofu into small crumbled pieces.
  2. Separate 3 sheets of prepared puff pastry, and set aside to thaw. Line two baking sheets with baking paper. Preheat oven to 180C (170C fan forced, 350F, or gas mark 4).
  3. In a blender, pulse the fried scallions until finely crushed – this will be a super flavourful replacement for the breadcrumbs traditionally used in sausage rolls for keeping the filling from shrinking.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the tofu with the fried scallion crumbs and remaining filling ingredients. Mix well. Add up to 3 eggs until mixture binds and holds.
  5. Working with one sheet at a time, use a sharp knife to carefully cut puff pastry into thirds from top to bottom, then left to right, creating 9 even squares. Each of these squares you’ve cut will be used to individually wrap the tofu rolls.
  6. Take approximately 2 tablespoons of the mixture and shape into a log, placing diagonally across each small square of pastry. Brush the entire surface of the mixture and pastry with the beaten egg. To seal the roll, take the exposed top corner and fold across the top of the mince mixture. Take the opposite bottom corner and gently fold and press on top of the first pastry corner. Repeat with remaining filling and puff pastry sheets and arrange folded pastry rolls onto lined baking sheets.
  7. Brush the tops of the pastry with the remaining egg and place into the oven, baking one sheet at a time for 30 minutes, or until the tops of the pastry are golden brown.
  8. Combine the ketchup with sriracha and mix well to create dipping sauce, and serve with the pastry rolls. Enjoy!

Vietnamese-inspired Tofu Rolls

Photo Courtesy & Recipe Copyright © 2021 | Jialing Mew (@jialingmew)

BON APPÉTIT

– Jialing Mew

myTaste.com

Mee Goreng Mamak (Mamak-style Stir-Fried Noodles)

Mee Goreng Mamak (Mamak-style Stir-Fried Noodles)

Hello Everyone! We’re venturing forward on our Flavours of Southeast Asia journey through Malaysia with a dish that’s very close to my heart. Now, you probably already know that there are countless recipes for mee goreng (fried noodles), that vary depending on its country or region of origin, but tonight in particular, I will be sharing a Mamak-style mee goreng dish; a staple of ours that we would always order when my family and I were at our favourite roti canai eatery.

Mee Goreng Mamak (Mamak-style Stir-Fried Noodles)

Mamak is a local word used to describe people of Indian-Muslim origins in Malaysia; and thus with these two cultures merging together created a unique dish known as Mee Goreng Mamak, or in English, Mamak-style Stir-Fried Noodles. It is normally made with fresh egg noodles, boiled potatoes, fried tofu, and Chinese greens of choice that is tossed in a delicious sauce, but you can also bulk it up with other proteins such as chicken, squid, or seafood. Pork and beef are typically avoided for obvious reasons.

If you’re looking for a way to change up your weeknight noodle meals, then this is a recipe you should definitely try out. It’s quick, easy, and made with ingredients that you can easily source at your local market or grocer. Mee Goreng Mamak is a delicious blend of spicy, savoury, sweet, tangy, smoky (from all that wok hay), and sticky flavours in a single dish. The recipe that I will be sharing tonight is perfect for ovo-vegetarians.

Mee Goreng Mamak (Mamak-style Stir-Fried Noodles) Ingredients

PREP TIME 15 MINS | COOKING TIME 30 MINS | SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

For the sauce

  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 tbsp ketchup
  • 2 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp curry powder
  • 1 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp sambal paste
  • 2 tsp white granulated sugar

For the noodles

  • 2 x 500g packs fresh yellow noodles, washed and drained*
  • 4 pcs firm tofu, fried and cut into chunks
  • 2 medium-sized cooked potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, minced
  • Spring onion
  • 2 large free-range eggs
  • Handful of celery leaves
  • 1/2 cup bean sprouts
  • Oil, for cooking
  • Chinese cabbage, blanched
  • Red pepper, sliced
  • Lemon wedges, optional

*Fresh yellow noodles are usually oiled. Rinse it in cold water to loosen up the threads and remove part of the oil, or you can quickly blanch it in hot water and drain before using.

METHOD

  1. Sauce: In a medium-sized bowl, mix all the ingredients together until well combined. Set aside until ready to use.
  2. Mee Goreng Mamak: Add oil in a large pan over high heat. Add the garlic and white/light green part of the spring onion and sauté until the garlic is lightly golden and fragrant, about 30 seconds.
  3. Add the yellow noodles and fry for about a minute or two. Push the noodles to the side and add the eggs. Let the eggs cook a little to set and then mix it into the noodles.
  4. Add the fried tofu, cooked potatoes, celery leaves, and the sauce mixture to the noodles. Toss until the noodles are evenly coated with the sauce, frying for about 3 to 4 minutes. Try not to mix too hard or it will break up the noodles into tiny threads.
  5. Add the remaining spring onion and bean sprouts. Give it another quick toss, about a minute or so for the bean sprouts to cook.
  6. Once done, transfer to individual serving plates and serve with red peppers and Chinese cabbage (or any greens of your choice). Garnish with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice and enjoy immediately while hot!

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BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

Khua Mee (Fried & Caramelised Rice Noodles)

Khua Mee (Fried & Caramelised Rice Noodles)

Hello everyone! This will be the second and last dish that I will be sharing on our quick trip to Laos. As I mentioned in my previous post, I am not very knowledgeable when it comes to Lao cuisine and will only be sharing recipes that I am familiar with in terms of taste and similar dishes from their neighbouring countries.

Khua Mee, or in English, Fried & Caramelised Rice Noodles, is the Laotian cousin of what Pad Thai is in Thailand. Now, while I’ve never had Khua Mee before until I experimented for Amcarmen’s Kitchen, I’ve had plenty of Pad Thai before, from my trips to Thailand, or just a visit to an authentic Thai restaurant back home in Brunei, and when I was living in Australia. Khua Mee is actually more sweet than savoury, and has a more unique flavour to it. This flavour comes from caramelising the sugar at the start of the cooking process which is then accompanied by other savoury flavours such as oyster sauce, fish sauce, and soy sauce. The sweet and savoury marriage of flavours is what sets this dish apart from other noodle dishes.

Khua Mee (Fried & Caramelised Rice Noodles)

The dish is fairly easy to put together. I guess the only tricky part would be the caramelisation of the sugar if you’re not used to it. You want to keep the heat on a medium-low temperature and watch it like a hawk so that the sugar does not burn. Traditionally, this noodle dish is topped with a fried egg omelette and bean sprouts. If you want to make this dish more substantial, you can also bulk it up with beef, pork, chicken, or prawns. To keep this ovo-vegetarian friendly though, my choice of protein was firm tofu. I also used mushroom sauce instead of oyster sauce, and omitted the fish sauce by adding more salt, as needed, instead. To add more flavour, I used homemade vegetable stock instead of water as the liquid base for the rice noodles to soak up.

Push the Pad Thai aside for now because once you take a bite and get a mouthful of these caramelised noodles, fried omelette, fresh herbs, and fried chillies, you will know why this is a much loved Laotian dish. It’s also a perfect potluck party dish as it tastes even better when served at room temperature.

Khua Mee (Fried & Caramelised Rice Noodles) Ingredients

PREP TIME 30 MINS | COOKING TIME 10 MINS | SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

For the fried omelette

  • 4 large free range eggs
  • Spring onion, green part
  • Salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
  • 2 tbsp cooking oil

For the fried noodles

  • 1 packet (500g) rice noodles
  • 4 tbsp cooking oil
  • 4 tbsp white granulated sugar
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 2 small red onions, halved then sliced thinly
  • 1 & 1/2 cup homemade vegetable stock*
  • 2 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp mushroom sauce
  • 1 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 1 cup bean sprouts
  • Spring onion
  • Fried red chillies
  • Fried tofu
  • Salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste
  • Calamansi or lemon, to garnish

*You can use store-bought vegetable stock, or water instead.

METHOD

  1. Noodles: Soak the rice noodles in room temperature water for 30 minutes. Set aside.
  2. Fried Omelette: While the rice noodles are soaking, whisk the eggs in a medium-sized bowl, season with salt and cracked black pepper, and add the spring onion.
  3. Add cooking oil in a large pan over high heat. Pour in the egg mixture and cook until firm and slightly brown around the edges, about 2 to 3 minutes. Flip and cook for a further 1 minute then transfer to a plate and cut into long strips. Set aside.
  4. Fried Noodles: Add the 4 tablespoons of cooking oil in the same pan, and bring the heat down to medium-low. Add the sugar and caramelise until melted and lightly golden in colour.
  5. Add the minced garlic and onions, and cook for about 30 seconds. Don’t cook it for too long as the sugar will start to darken faster and most likely burn at this point.
  6. Immediately add in the vegetable broth to stop the caramelisation process of the sugar, followed by the light and dark soy sauce, mushroom sauce, white part of the spring onion, and season with a pinch of salt. Turn the heat up to medium, mix, and then leave to simmer for about 5 to 10 minutes for the flavours to develop.
  7. Add the soaked rice noodles and cook until most of the liquid has been absorbed before adding the bean sprouts, fried tofu and fried omelette slices. Mix and cook until the liquid has been absorbed then add in the green part of the spring onion and the fried red chillies.
  8. Transfer to individual serving plates and add a squeeze of calamansi or lemon juice before eating. Enjoy!

Khua Mee (Fried & Caramelised Rice Noodles)

Khua Mee (Fried & Caramelised Rice Noodles)

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

Tahu Telur (Indonesian Tofu Omelette)

Hello Everyone! So if you saw my recipe yesterday for Homemade Egg Tofu, you’ll know that I’m back with a recipe that uses them in the dish that I will be sharing tonight.

Back in my very first post in May when we first landed in Indonesia for our Flavours of Southeast journey, I mentioned that there was this Indonesian restaurant in Brunei that my family and I would always go to on a weekly basis. One of the dishes that we would always order is Tahu Telur, or in English, Indonesian Tofu Omelette. It is an inexpensive and humble dish that originated from East Java, and although meatless, it is packed with protein from the eggs and tofu, making it perfect for those on a ovo-vegetarian diet. The dish may seem intimidating in terms of its preparation, but trust me, it doesn’t require much skill and is actually easy to put together. It’s also worth it!

Tahu Telur (Indonesian Tofu Omelette)

What makes this tahu telur dish stand out from other omelettes out there is its tower-like structure. You can also find flat versions of this dish, but it’s not as exciting and dynamic as a vertical omelette in my opinion. To achieve this tower, you’ll need a ring mold to cook the eggs and tofu in. If you do not have a ring mold, you can DIY one from a tin can that is at least 4 inches in diameter and 5 inches high. This is what I did when I could not seem to find ring molds in stores; and it worked just as good!

When fried the eggs are fluffy and crispy on the outside, but soft and moist on the inside when you cut through it due to the tofu that’s mixed in it. You can top it with various fresh vegetables of your choice to add a different crunch that’s refreshing to the palette. The dish is then brought together with a sweet and spicy peanut sauce that you can easily adjust to suit your liking.

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PREP TIME 15 MINS | COOKING TIME 20 MINS | SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

For the tauhu telur

  • 5 large free-range eggs
  • 2 tbsp tapioca flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • Homemade egg tofu*, deep fried
  • Cooking oil

*I used a quarter serving of this recipe, and cut them into 8 rectangular pieces.

For the peanut sauce

  • 5 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 3 red chillies
  • 1 cup hot water
  • 3 tbsp kicap manis
  • 2 tbsp coconut sugar
  • 1 & 1/2 tbsp peanut butter

To garnish

  • Blanched bean sprouts
  • Fresh red chillies, chopped
  • Spring onion

METHOD

  1. Peanut Sauce: In a small pan, fry the garlic cloves and chillies until soft and browned. Add all the ingredients into a blender and blend until combined.
  2. Transfer the mixture to a small saucepan and cook over medium heat until reduced and slightly thickened. You may want to add more kicap manis at this point to darken the colour of the sauce. Once done, remove from the heat and set aside. Reheat later if needed.
  3. Tauhu Telur: Beat the eggs, tapioca flour, and salt together until well combined. Dissolve as much of the flour as possible.
  4. In a large frying pan, heat over medium-high, enough oil so that you are able to scoop up using a ladle, I used about 6 to 8 cups. Place the ring mold in the center of the pan and ladle the hot oil over the mold to prevent sticking while cooking.
  5. Pour about a third of the egg mixture into the ring mold and let it cook for about 30 to 45 seconds. Add half of the deep fried egg tofu to the eggs and cook for a further 30 seconds, ladling hot oil into the mold.
  6. Add another third of the egg mixture and top with the remaining egg tofu. Ladle more hot oil into the mold, and then add the remaining egg mixture on top.
  7. Reduce the heat down to medium and cook by continuously ladling hot oil on top of the mixture. Remove the oil if it stops sizzling and pour hot oil on top, repeating until golden brown in colour, about 4 to 5 minutes, or until the egg is cooked enough that it can hold its shape upright.
  8. Using a knife, gently scrape the inner side of the mold to loosen the egg. Use tongs to slowly and gently pull the mold away from the egg. Continue to cook until the sides are golden brown in colour.
  9. Once done, remove from the pan and shake off any excess oil. Transfer to a plate lined with paper towels to soak up any more excess grease.
  10. Transfer to a serving plate with the peanut sauce, and top with the blanched bean sprouts, fresh chillies, and spring onion. Enjoy!

Tahu Telur (Indonesian Tofu Omelette)

1909

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

Homemade Egg Tofu

Homemade Egg Tofu

Hello Everyone! Apologies for being MIA for the past few weeks; I’ve been having some issues with accessing the photos for my recipes, along with other things that have kept me busy in the past weeks. Anyway, a new month usually means we’ll be travelling to another country on our Flavours of Southeast Asia journey, but since I was away for half of May, I already had Indonesian dishes cooked up and planned for then. I’ll continue to share them first before we fly off to another country.

Tonight’s recipe isn’t particularly Indonesian; in fact it is of Chinese origin, commonly consumed in Hong Kong and Taiwanese cuisine. Egg tofu is made from eggs and soy milk, which means it is much sturdier than silken tofu. The main difference between the two is that egg tofu is not vegan because it has eggs whereas silken tofu is typically vegan since it’s made by coagulating soy milk without curdling it. Egg tofu is vegetarian if you consume eggs as part of your vegetarian diet. You can usually find egg tofu in a tube-like shape sold in many Asian groceries, but since I could not find any at my local grocer/supermarket, I decided to do some research and found out that it’s actually super simple to make at home! All you need are eggs, soy milk, salt, and voilà!

Homemade Egg Tofu

But wait! Before I dive any further, why am I sharing a recipe for Chinese-style egg tofu when we’re supposed to be venturing in Indonesia? Well, I will be sharing a recipe that uses egg tofu in an Indonesian dish; I just decided that I want to share this recipe for egg tofu separately. It’s so versatile; you can pan/deep fry it, boil it, and braise it. Use this recipe as a base for other delicious recipes, like what I’ll be sharing tomorrow night.

Normally I would opt to make my own homemade soy milk, but because I could not source soy beans at my local grocer or supermarkets, I used store-bought soy milk instead. Now, it’s important to use unsweetened soy milk. The first time I tried this recipe out, I used slightly sweetened soy milk because that’s what I had sitting in my pantry at that moment. The result is very different, especially if you’re going to fry the egg tofu.

The result I got when I used sweetened soy milk was that the exterior of the egg tofu turned dark brown in patches, almost like it caramalised instead of fried. It wasn’t crispy at all. When I made a second batch using unsweetened soy milk, the exterior of the egg tofu was perfectly golden brown in colour when fried, and was also extra crispy. So please use unsweetened soy milk!

Homemade Egg Tofu Ingredients

PREP TIME 10 MINS | COOKING TIME 30 MINS | SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

  • 7 large free-range eggs
  • 2 cups unsweetened soy milk, homemade or store-bought
  • 1/2 tsp salt

METHOD

  1. Whisk the eggs and salt together in a large mixing bowl until well combined. While continuing to whisk, slowly pour the soy milk into the eggs.
  2. Line a square baking dish (8-in x 8-in) with parchment paper, and sieve the egg mixture into the prepared pan. Get rid of any bubbles on the surface. Cover with aluminium foil and steam for 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the egg tofu comes out clean.
  3. Once done, remove from the steamer and transfer the egg tofu to a plate lined with paper towels to soak up all the excess moisture. This step is really important if you’re going to pan/deep fry these later to prevent oil splatters.
  4. Set aside to cool down completely before cutting into desired shapes and sizes. Enjoy as it is, fried, or include it in various dishes.

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Stay tuned to see what I’ve used this egg tofu for!

How to store egg tofu?

  • Store raw egg tofu in a container with water and use it within 2 days. Make sure to drain the water and pat dry before cooking with them, especially if you’re going to fry them.
  • Cooked egg tofu can last up to 3 days if refrigerated, however, it’s best to eat it freshly pan fried.

Homemade Egg Tofu

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com