Homemade Egg Tofu

Homemade Egg Tofu

Hello Everyone! Apologies for being MIA for the past few weeks; I’ve been having some issues with accessing the photos for my recipes, along with other things that have kept me busy in the past weeks. Anyway, a new month usually means we’ll be travelling to another country on our Flavours of Southeast Asia journey, but since I was away for half of May, I already had Indonesian dishes cooked up and planned for then. I’ll continue to share them first before we fly off to another country.

Tonight’s recipe isn’t particularly Indonesian; in fact it is of Chinese origin, commonly consumed in Hong Kong and Taiwanese cuisine. Egg tofu is made from eggs and soy milk, which means it is much sturdier than silken tofu. The main difference between the two is that egg tofu is not vegan because it has eggs whereas silken tofu is typically vegan since it’s made by coagulating soy milk without curdling it. Egg tofu is vegetarian if you consume eggs as part of your vegetarian diet. You can usually find egg tofu in a tube-like shape sold in many Asian groceries, but since I could not find any at my local grocer/supermarket, I decided to do some research and found out that it’s actually super simple to make at home! All you need are eggs, soy milk, salt, and voilà!

Homemade Egg Tofu

But wait! Before I dive any further, why am I sharing a recipe for Chinese-style egg tofu when we’re supposed to be venturing in Indonesia? Well, I will be sharing a recipe that uses egg tofu in an Indonesian dish; I just decided that I want to share this recipe for egg tofu separately. It’s so versatile; you can pan/deep fry it, boil it, and braise it. Use this recipe as a base for other delicious recipes, like what I’ll be sharing tomorrow night.

Normally I would opt to make my own homemade soy milk, but because I could not source soy beans at my local grocer or supermarkets, I used store-bought soy milk instead. Now, it’s important to use unsweetened soy milk. The first time I tried this recipe out, I used slightly sweetened soy milk because that’s what I had sitting in my pantry at that moment. The result is very different, especially if you’re going to fry the egg tofu.

The result I got when I used sweetened soy milk was that the exterior of the egg tofu turned dark brown in patches, almost like it caramalised instead of fried. It wasn’t crispy at all. When I made a second batch using unsweetened soy milk, the exterior of the egg tofu was perfectly golden brown in colour when fried, and was also extra crispy. So please use unsweetened soy milk!

Homemade Egg Tofu Ingredients

PREP TIME 10 MINS | COOKING TIME 30 MINS | SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

  • 7 large free-range eggs
  • 2 cups unsweetened soy milk, homemade or store-bought
  • 1/2 tsp salt

METHOD

  1. Whisk the eggs and salt together in a large mixing bowl until well combined. While continuing to whisk, slowly pour the soy milk into the eggs.
  2. Line a square baking dish (8-in x 8-in) with parchment paper, and sieve the egg mixture into the prepared pan. Get rid of any bubbles on the surface. Cover with aluminium foil and steam for 30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the egg tofu comes out clean.
  3. Once done, remove from the steamer and transfer the egg tofu to a plate lined with paper towels to soak up all the excess moisture. This step is really important if you’re going to pan/deep fry these later to prevent oil splatters.
  4. Set aside to cool down completely before cutting into desired shapes and sizes. Enjoy as it is, fried, or include it in various dishes.

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Stay tuned to see what I’ve used this egg tofu for!

How to store egg tofu?

  • Store raw egg tofu in a container with water and use it within 2 days. Make sure to drain the water and pat dry before cooking with them, especially if you’re going to fry them.
  • Cooked egg tofu can last up to 3 days if refrigerated, however, it’s best to eat it freshly pan fried.

Homemade Egg Tofu

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

Masala Chai Tea with Soy Milk Ingredients

Masala Chai Tea with Soy Milk

Hello Everyone! So on Tuesday I posted a recipe for homemade soy milk. The first thing I thought after making having made the soy milk was what other things could I do with it to make another delicious drink. So today’s recipe uses the soy milk that I made to make a masala chai tea. I mean, you can always use store bought soy milk, or any other milk for that matter.

Masala Chai (literally translated: ‘mixed-spice tea’) is basically a flavoured tea beverage made by brewing black tea with a mixture of aromatic Indian spices and herbs. Nowadays, it is a very popular and feature drink in many coffee and tea houses. Chai is traditionally prepared by brewing green cardamom pods, cinnamon sticks, ground cloves, ground ginger, and black peppercorn together with black tea leaves. Most retail versions of this tea includes tea bags for infusion, instant powdered mixtures, and concentrates. I used tea bags for mine only because I could not find any loose black tea leaves in stores.

I love chai tea. In fact, I ordered it almost every time I went to a café, aside from a café latte that is. I was surprised that it was that easy to make when I came across a recipe online on how to make you own chai tea.

Masala Chai Tea with Soy Milk Ingredients

PREP TIME 5 MINS | COOKING TIME 10-15 MINS | SERVES 4-5

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 cups water
  • 1 cup homemade soy milk (or any other type of milk)
  • 1/4 cup loose black tea leaves (or about 5 tea bags)
  • 3 tablespoons granulated white sugar
  • 1/4 inch of ginger root, peeled and sliced thinly
  • 6 cardamom pods
  • 6 whole cloves
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • Several peppercorns

Other optional spices that you can add to your chair tea inlaced: vanilla, almond, nutmeg, bay leaves, star anise, or fennel and allspice; I added star anise to mine.

METHOD

  1. Combine the water, spices, and tea in a medium-sized saucepan. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Once boiling, let it boil for a further 5 minutes and then turn the heat off. Let the mixture steep for at least 10-15 minutes.
  2. Strain the tea mixture and discard the spices. Add the soy milk and sugar to the strained tea mixture and stir well. Then reheat the tea until piping hot.
  3. Enjoy! Serves about 4 cups of tea.

Masala Chai Tea with Soy Milk

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com

Homemade Soy Milk Ingredients

Homemade Soy Milk

Hello Everyone! I’ve got a few drinks that I want to cover on the blog for the next two weeks; simple but very tasty indeed! Today’s recipe is pretty straight forward, just plain regular soy milk, but definitely much richer than those that you find at the stores/markets because the ones I’ve bought are usually very watered down. By making your own soy milk as well, you ensure that no other extra ingredients go into them, especially sugar in my case (or more like in the case of my mom who is a diabetic).

Homemade Soy Milk Process

Homemade Soy Milk Process

Though it sounds very simple and the process doesn’t require a lot of skill, it requires a lot of time. Firstly having to soak the beans for a couple of hours until they are soft takes about 4-5 hours of waiting (the longer the better I guess). Then having to blend the beans with water and strain out the liquids using a muslin cloth, batch by batch; and then finally boiling it with the pandan leaves for about 30 minutes. Indeed simple, but can be time consuming. Whenever I make soy milk, I always needs another pair of hands in the kitchen and it’s usually my mom who does the straining while I do the blending.

Homemade Soy Milk Ingredients

PREP TIME 5 HOURS 30 MINS | COOKING TIME 30 MINS | SERVES 10-12

INGREDIENTS

  • 1kg soybeans
  • 5 pandan leaves
  • 3 litres water

METHOD

  1. Place the soybeans in a large bowl of water and soak for 4-5 hours or until the beans have doubled in size and have softened. Drain.
  2. Working in batches, add about 2 cups of the softened soybeans into the blender together with about 3 cups of water. Blend until the mixture is smooth.
  3. Pour out the mixture onto a muslin cloth placed over a large bowl. Strain and squeeze out as much of the liquids as possible. Transfer the remaining soybean pulp into another bowl.
  4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for the remaining soybeans.
  5. Transfer the raw soy milk to a large cooking pot and together with the pandan leaves, boil of about 30 minutes. Stir the mixture at intervals to avoid the milk sticking to the bottom of the pot. Skim the top to get some of the foam off.
  6. Add about a quarter cup of sugar if you wish (we usually add a teaspoon of sugar afterwards in our mug of soy milk), or flavour it up any way you want. Some flavouring suggestions include: chocolate, honey, vanilla, etc.
  7. Drink and enjoy either hot or cold!

Homemade Soy Milk Process

Homemade Soy Milk

PS: Don’t throw the leftover bean pulp away! You can make your very own homemade tofu from it! Visit this the Food Network for more on how to make your own tofu.

BON APPÉTIT

– Ally xx

myTaste.com